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7 leadership principles that apply to all businesses

Pursue mission-critical objectives with a laser-like focus. Spare no expense committing both talent and capital resources to ensure these objectives will be achieved. Commit these resources as early as possible. It is better to overcommit resources than under commit them, which may jeopardize the outcome.

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What are the traits of effective leaders?

Effective leaders recognize that challenging paradigms and thinking “out of the box” are crucial for achieving breakthrough results and building competitive advantage. Employees who challenge paradigms are your change agents. Listen to them.

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7 Qualities That Turns Bosses Into Leaders

Employees work for bosses

Employees follow leaders.

Under a boss, most people will do their job until it’s completed.  Under a leader, people develop a passionate commitment towards work, often motivating them to do more than the job if it means it can help the team achieve the leader’s vision. Organizations are dramatically more satisfied and more productive when they follow a leader rather than work for a boss.

What are some key qualities that leaders have that bosses don’t?

– COMMUNICATES a clear vision of goals together with each  employee’s role and benefit from making it happen.

– CONFIDENCE in a successful outcome for his/her plan.

– TEAM BUILDER in adding competent people who have the skills for achieving the vision and enhance the organizational culture.

– RESPECT for the team, both for the people and ideas.

– FAIRNESS without double standards.

– RESPONSIBILITY is taken for his/her decisions no matter their outcome.   The team feels that the leader always has their back.

– THANK YOUs are given generously.


Stan Silverman is the founder and CEO of Silverman Leadership. He is a writer and speaker, advising C-suite executives about issues and on cultivating a leadership culture within their organizations. Stan is Vice Chairman of the Board of Drexel University and a director of Friends Select School and Faith in the Future. He is the former President and CEO of PQ Corporation. Follow: @StanSilverman. Connect: Stan@SilvermanLeadership.com. Website: www.SilvermanLeadership.com

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7 Tips On Bringing New Executives Into Your Leadership Culture

Most companies have an orientation training program for new executives joining the team. Unfortunately, many programs do not include much, if any, orientation pertaining to the company’s Leadership Culture. Unless the new executive understands and embraces the Leadership Culture, it is unlikely they will be able to maximize his or her effectiveness at your company. Below are seven recommendations for introducing new executives to your Leadership Culture:

1) If you haven’t already done so, define your Leadership Culture and make sure your current leadership team knows it, can articulate it, supports it and is living it.

2) Communicate about your Leadership Culture with your HR team, so they identify candidates, in the first place, who are most likely to embrace your distinctive management environment and Leadership Culture.

3) At the time of the interview, ask executive level job candidates about the tone at the top they embrace and institutional culture they prefer to work in, as well as the culture they will establish within the organization they will lead. Also ask them about their leadership and management style, to assess whether they are a good fit.

4) Communicate your Leadership Culture to the new executive, and reinforce it at orientation and during the early days of employment.

5) Request feedback from the new executive to ensure that he/she understands and is comfortable with the Leadership Culture.

6) Also, during the interview process, invite other members of your team to discuss your Leadership Culture with the candidate so that he/she hears about it from others and understands its high priority at your organization.

7) Follow up in about 2-3 months after employment, to discuss with the new executive how he/she is succeeding within that Culture. Obtain informal feedback from the organization on how the new executive is doing.

Leadership Culture begins at the top. It is critical that every executive makes it a priority by living it and inspiring others.


Stan Silverman is the founder and CEO of Silverman Leadership. He is a writer and speaker, advising C-suite executives about issues and on cultivating a leadership culture within their organizations. Stan is Vice Chairman of the Board of Drexel University and a director of Friends Select School and Faith in the Future. He is the former President and CEO of PQ Corporation. Follow: @StanSilverman. Connect: Stan@SilvermanLeadership.com. Website: www.SilvermanLeadership.com